Skip to content

Posts tagged ‘refugees and asylum seekers’

‘Impossible to self-isolate,’ Refugees in Indonesia Fear Coronavirus Outbreak

COMMENT: ‘Impossible to self-isolate,’ Refugees in Indonesia fear coronavirus outbreak.

Written by JN Joniad.

He is a Rohingya refugee living in Indonesia after attempting to flee Myanmar for Australia in 2013. He is now witnessing Indonesia’s large refugee and asylum seeker population battle with the coronavirus pandemic.

“For thousands of refugees and asylum seekers in Indonesia, it is impossible to keep any social distance.

There are over 14,000 refugees and asylum seekers living in limbo in Indonesia, with thousands having fled their country to seek refuge in Australia, only to be stranded there in transit. They are now at a greater risk of contracting COVID-19.  

In Jakarta, many refugees and asylum seekers share rooms and cramped apartments. Those in International Organisation for Migration (IOM) accommodation and camps live in overcrowded conditions. 

It is almost impossible for them to practice social distancing. With no basic rights to work, travel and use public health services, refugees and asylum seekers are further marginalised and the most vulnerable to the spread of coronavirus. “

Read the full article in https://www.sbs.com.au/news/dateline/comment-impossible-to-self-isolate-refugees-in-indonesia-fear-coronavirus-outbreak

Disclaimer: The views, information, or opinions expressed in the article above are solely those of the individuals involved and do not necessarily represent official views nor stance those of Perkumpulan SUAKA members. SUAKA is not responsible and does not verify for accuracy any of the information contained in the article above. The primary purpose of sharing the article above is to inform and provide alternative perspectives, with the end goal to provide comprehensive and holistic solutions for refugee rights protection.

Self Help Kit: First Instance on UNHCR Refugee Status Determination

Due to the large number of people requesting legal aid, Suaka is unable to meet with you until you have done your best to provide these things. If you cannot read and write please speak with other members of your community and ask them to help you write your statement.

This page is for information only. It is not legal advice.

First Instance information, please read carefully.

This page explains the process of applying for refugee status in Indonesia.

Please download and read our First Instance Self Help Kit (SHK).
Suaka RSD Self Help Kit – FIRST INSTANCE.pdf

SHKs are only available in English for now. They will soon be available in Farsi, Dari, Arabic, Tamil, Urdu, Oromo, Bahasa Indonesia.

SUAKA SHKs include information about every step of the ‘Refugee Status Determination’ process, to help you understand what is required and what your rights are, including:
– what it means to be a refugee
– the process of becoming a refugee
– what information to provide to UNHCR
– how to write your statement.

Once you have read the SHK, begin to write your statement.

If you would like advice on your completed statement please email suaka.legalaid@gmail.com and we will contact you.
Your email must include:

1. Copy of an asylum seeker certificate for every member of your family
2. Your written statement/history
3. Your contact phone number

Please find information about Suaka’s services below:

SUAKA’s legal advisors are trained volunteers, they receive no payment.
SUAKA’s legal services are free. If anyone in your community asks for money to help you speak to us this is wrong.
SUAKA’s legal services are confidential – we do not share your information with any other organisation.
SUAKA is independent from UNHCR, IOM, Immigration, Police and Government.
SUAKA’s legal advisors are not able to influence UNHCR’s decisions. We cannot guarantee your application will succeed. We cannot make your application proceed more quickly.
SUAKA provides legal assistance only in relation to UNHCR applications for asylum (Refugee Status Determination – RSD).
SUAKA can provide limited information about the resettlement process but cannot assist with resettlement or sponsorship
SUAKA cannot provide material, financial or other assistance.
SUAKA’s Legal Aid Services are provided in accordance with the Nairobi Code
SUAKA’s Volunteer Legal Advisors follow SUAKA Legal Aid Services Code of Conduct

You may also message Suaka legal aid on Whatsapp, Viber or Line on 0812 8425 6583

2013 Refugee Info Sessions 2

Protection at Sea – Indonesia: Saransika’s Story

With the UNHCR hosting it’s annual High-Commissioner’s Dialogue on “Protection At Sea” over 10-11 December 2014, they have prepared stories from refugees and asylum seekers sharing their experiences about why they had to flee by boat.

Saransika, a young Sri Lankan girl currently in Indonesia says:

“What happened to me and my family should not happen to others”.

It’s such a tragic story but we encourage you to share it with your friends on social media so they understand that people take these dangerous boat journeys because there are no safe pathways to protection available to them: