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Posts tagged ‘Refugee’

Coronavirus and Refugee

Coronavirus and Refugee

Written by Julio Achmadi. Member of SUAKA, Coordinator of Legal Empowerment.

“At least 34 of the 114 countries affected by coronavirus outbreak are hosts to refugee populations, including Indonesia. Based on UNHCR Indonesia’s statistics in November 2019, Indonesia is a host of 13,693 asylum seekers and refugees (ASR), 28% of which are children and 2% elderly. ASR community in Indonesia is one of the most vulnerable, if not the most, to coronavirus.

Their vulnerability level is much higher due to their handicaps living in Indonesia. There are very limited resources allocated by the government for ASR community in general, there’s no protection of basic rights by the law, and no dissemination from the government on the virus outbreak to the ASR community.

ASR in Indonesia also face a problem in understanding actual situation on coronavirus because of the language barrier, thus violating their right to access to information. With no right to work, ASR communities in Indonesia might not be able to afford nutritional foods and sanitary products to protect them from the infectious disease. As of now, ASR community and Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) have been doing the work in translating information on coronavirus from various sources of languages to the ones understandable by refugees.”

Read the full article to see what types of solution that can be offered, short and long term, by following this link: https://en.tempo.co/read/1326578/coronavirus-and-refugee

‘Impossible to self-isolate,’ Refugees in Indonesia Fear Coronavirus Outbreak

COMMENT: ‘Impossible to self-isolate,’ Refugees in Indonesia fear coronavirus outbreak.

Written by JN Joniad.

He is a Rohingya refugee living in Indonesia after attempting to flee Myanmar for Australia in 2013. He is now witnessing Indonesia’s large refugee and asylum seeker population battle with the coronavirus pandemic.

“For thousands of refugees and asylum seekers in Indonesia, it is impossible to keep any social distance.

There are over 14,000 refugees and asylum seekers living in limbo in Indonesia, with thousands having fled their country to seek refuge in Australia, only to be stranded there in transit. They are now at a greater risk of contracting COVID-19.  

In Jakarta, many refugees and asylum seekers share rooms and cramped apartments. Those in International Organisation for Migration (IOM) accommodation and camps live in overcrowded conditions. 

It is almost impossible for them to practice social distancing. With no basic rights to work, travel and use public health services, refugees and asylum seekers are further marginalised and the most vulnerable to the spread of coronavirus. “

Read the full article in https://www.sbs.com.au/news/dateline/comment-impossible-to-self-isolate-refugees-in-indonesia-fear-coronavirus-outbreak

Disclaimer: The views, information, or opinions expressed in the article above are solely those of the individuals involved and do not necessarily represent official views nor stance those of Perkumpulan SUAKA members. SUAKA is not responsible and does not verify for accuracy any of the information contained in the article above. The primary purpose of sharing the article above is to inform and provide alternative perspectives, with the end goal to provide comprehensive and holistic solutions for refugee rights protection.

COVID-19 Information for Refugees in Indonesia

(This article will be updated continuously to reflect current situation)

The situation with Coronavirus, known also as SARS-CoV-2 or COVID-19, in Indonesia is escalating very quickly.

The government already issue nationwide awareness for prevention and mitigation. WHO also already declared this case as a pandemic earlier today. Calling COVID-19 a pandemic does not mean that it has become more deadly, it is an acknowledgment of its global spread.

SUAKA asks the refugee community not to be panic. The virus transmission is preventable and can be managed through practicing personal hygiene, such as hand-washing, avoid face-touching, and follow good cough and sneeze etiquette. If you develop symptoms, and have been in close contact with a person known to have COVID-19, you should go to the doctor.

Don’t believe hoaxes on the internet, always double-check news or chain text messages shared on social media or messaging application (whatsapp/line/viber etc) THROUGH a reliable news source.

Read more

Pathways to Refugee Wellbeing, Research on Asylum Seeker and Refugee in Indonesia

Who is conducting this study?

  • The Refugee Trauma and Recovery Program, from the University of New South Wales in Sydney, is working with HOST International, SUAKA and Universitas Gadjah Mada to conduct this study.

Why is the study important?

  • We want to learn about the experiences of refugees, and what kinds of things affect their wellbeing.
  • This will help us understand how refugees cope in their everyday life.
  • This knowledge will help to provide better support for refugees in a similar situation around the world.

Who can take part in this study?

  • Refugee and asylum-seeker adults (18 years +), who are eligible to participate.
  • As the surveys are on-line, you can take part in this study no matter where you live, as long as you have access to the internet. The surveys are in English, Arabic, Farsi, Dari, and Somali.
  • To take part in this study, you will need an email address. If you do not have an email address, you can get one here: (Gmail registration) One person can only use one email address.

What does the study involve?

  • First, we will ask you to register your interest in participating in this study, on our website.
  • Second, we will check if you are eligible to participate.
  • If you are eligible, and you agree to participate in the study, we will invite you to complete an online survey 4 times over 18 months.
  • The questions are about yourself, your experiences, your thoughts and feelings, and about the relationships you have with other people.
  • Each survey takes about one hour to complete.
  • To thank you for sharing your experiences, we will reimburse eligible participants for your time with an Indomaret voucher worth IDR 100,000 after you complete each survey.

What will happen to the information you collect from me?

  • All information provided by participants is highly confidential and is only accessed by the
    research team.
  • Only the UNSW research team and the HOST International Research Coordinator will have access to your personal information (e.g. contact details), so we can contact you for future time points.
  • Your information will not be shared with any service providers, UNHCR, or any
    governments.
  • These details will be stored separately from your survey responses.
  • Participating in this study will not affect the UNHCR process and the resettlement process.
  • You can choose to receive regular updates about the study in your own language.

Follow this link to register: www.rtrp-research.com/pathways-to-refugee-wellbeing-indonesia

 

Self Help Kit: Reopening on UNHCR Refugee Status Determination

Information on UNHCR Reopening process.

Due to a large number of people requesting legal aid, Suaka is unable to meet with you until you have done your best to provide these things. If you cannot read and write please speak with other members of your community and ask them to help you write your statement.

This page is for information only. It is not legal advice.

Please find information about Suaka’s services below:

SUAKA’s legal advisors are trained volunteers, they receive no payment.
SUAKA’s legal services are free. If anyone in your community asks for money to help you speak to us this is wrong.
SUAKA’s legal services are confidential – we do not share your information with any other organization.
SUAKA is independent from UNHCR, IOM, Immigration, Police and Government.
SUAKA’s legal advisors are not able to influence UNHCR’s decisions. We cannot guarantee your application will succeed. We cannot make your application proceed more quickly.
SUAKA provides legal assistance only in relation to UNHCR applications for asylum (Refugee Status Determination – RSD).
SUAKA can provide limited information about the resettlement process but cannot assist with resettlement or sponsorship
SUAKA cannot provide material, financial or other assistance.
SUAKA’s Legal Aid Services are provided in accordance with the Nairobi Code.
SUAKA’s Volunteer Legal Advisors follow SUAKA Legal Aid Services Code of Conduct.

UNHCR request to Reopen your file.

If you have already been considered and refused refugee status after your first interview with UNHCR, and your appeal has also been considered and refused, UNHCR will close your file. They will not issue another asylum seeker certificate.

Suaka has a Self Help Kit (SHK) with information that may help you decide whether you want to submit a reopening request to UNHCR. Only around 5% of reopening requests are successful.

Suaka does not have enough lawyers to assist with reopening requests to UNHCR. You must write a statement to UNHCR yourself so you should read the SHK very carefully.

Download the Reopening Self Help Kit by clicking here

SHKs are only available in English for now. They will soon be available in Farsi, Dari, Arabic, Tamil, Urdu, Oromo, Bahasa Indonesia.

The Reopening Self Help Kit includes important information.
The Reopening Self Help Kit will:

  • Explain the definition and criteria needed to become a refugee. It will help you understand whether you are a refugee under international law
  • Explain UNHCR’s process – how they recognize applicants as “refugees” and help you understand why your file was rejected and closed
  • Help you decide whether you should write a statement to request UNHCR reopen your file. Not all asylum seekers decide to write a statement and request UNHCR to reopen their file.
  • Help you decide whether you should write a statement to request UNHCR reopen your file. Not all asylum seekers decide to write a statement and request UNHCR to reopen their file.
  • Help you understand what information you should include in your reopening statement and how to write this – what it should look like.

There are only very limited reasons UNHCR will agree to reopen a file after they have already considered it twice. More information about this is on page 3 of SUAKA’s Reopening Self Help Kit.

After reading SUAKA’s Self Help Kit, if you decide to write to UNHCR about a reopening, it will take UNHCR a very long time to consider your request. It can take more than 12 or 18 months to receive a reply.

While you are waiting, you will not receive a new asylum seeker certificate and will not be under the protection of the UNHCR in Indonesia. There is nothing Suaka can do to make this process happen more quickly.

There is no deadline to submit a reopening request to UNHCR.

If you decide to write a reopening request, SUAKA legal aid can meet with you once to give advice on your statement.

Before we can help with you, you must email suaka.legalaid@gmail.com the following things:

  1. Copy of asylum seeker certificate for every member of your family
  2. Copies of both rejection letters you have recieved from UNHCR – First instance and Appeal.
  3. Copy of the appeal you wrote and submitted to UNHCR
  4. Your reopening statement
  5. Your contact phone number

You may also message Suaka legal aid on Whatsapp or Viber 0852 1350 8445