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Posts tagged ‘Refugee’

Storybook for Children on COVID-19

This book was a project developed by the Inter-Agency Standing Committee Reference Group on Mental Health and Psychosocial Support in Emergency Settings (IASC MHPSS RG). The project was supported by global, regional and country based experts from Member Agencies of the IASC MHPSS RG, in addition to parents, caregivers, teachers and children in 104 countries. A global survey was distributed in Arabic, English, Italian, French and Spanish to assess children’s mental health and psychosocial needs during the COVID-19 outbreak.

The e-book can be downloaded, by clicking here: My Hero is You, how kids can fight COVID-19

A framework of topics to be addressed through the story was developed using the survey results. The book was shared through storytelling to children in several countries affected by COVID-19. Feedback from children, parents and caregivers was then used to review and update the story.

Over 1,700 children, parents, caregivers and teachers from around the world took the time to share with us how they were coping with the COVID-19 pandemic. A big thank you to these children, their parents, caregivers and teachers for completing our surveys and influencing this story. This is a story developed for and by children around the world.

This IASC MHPSS RG acknowledge Helen Patuck for writing the story script and illustrating this book.

©IASC, 2020. This publication was published under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 IGO license (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 IGO; https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/igo). Under the terms of this license, you may reproduce, translate and adapt this Work for non-commercial purposes, provided the Work is appropriately cited.

Coronavirus and Refugee

Coronavirus and Refugee

Written by Julio Achmadi. Member of SUAKA, Coordinator of Legal Empowerment.

“At least 34 of the 114 countries affected by coronavirus outbreak are hosts to refugee populations, including Indonesia. Based on UNHCR Indonesia’s statistics in November 2019, Indonesia is a host of 13,693 asylum seekers and refugees (ASR), 28% of which are children and 2% elderly. ASR community in Indonesia is one of the most vulnerable, if not the most, to coronavirus.

Their vulnerability level is much higher due to their handicaps living in Indonesia. There are very limited resources allocated by the government for ASR community in general, there’s no protection of basic rights by the law, and no dissemination from the government on the virus outbreak to the ASR community.

ASR in Indonesia also face a problem in understanding actual situation on coronavirus because of the language barrier, thus violating their right to access to information. With no right to work, ASR communities in Indonesia might not be able to afford nutritional foods and sanitary products to protect them from the infectious disease. As of now, ASR community and Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) have been doing the work in translating information on coronavirus from various sources of languages to the ones understandable by refugees.”

Read the full article to see what types of solution that can be offered, short and long term, by following this link: https://en.tempo.co/read/1326578/coronavirus-and-refugee

‘Impossible to self-isolate,’ Refugees in Indonesia Fear Coronavirus Outbreak

COMMENT: ‘Impossible to self-isolate,’ Refugees in Indonesia fear coronavirus outbreak.

Written by JN Joniad.

He is a Rohingya refugee living in Indonesia after attempting to flee Myanmar for Australia in 2013. He is now witnessing Indonesia’s large refugee and asylum seeker population battle with the coronavirus pandemic.

“For thousands of refugees and asylum seekers in Indonesia, it is impossible to keep any social distance.

There are over 14,000 refugees and asylum seekers living in limbo in Indonesia, with thousands having fled their country to seek refuge in Australia, only to be stranded there in transit. They are now at a greater risk of contracting COVID-19.  

In Jakarta, many refugees and asylum seekers share rooms and cramped apartments. Those in International Organisation for Migration (IOM) accommodation and camps live in overcrowded conditions. 

It is almost impossible for them to practice social distancing. With no basic rights to work, travel and use public health services, refugees and asylum seekers are further marginalised and the most vulnerable to the spread of coronavirus. “

Read the full article in https://www.sbs.com.au/news/dateline/comment-impossible-to-self-isolate-refugees-in-indonesia-fear-coronavirus-outbreak

COVID-19 Information for Refugees in Indonesia

(This article will be updated continuously, last updated 30/03)

The situation with Coronavirus, known also as SARS-CoV-2 or COVID-19, in Indonesia is escalating very quickly.

For real-time data you can visit:

Jakarta (cases): https://corona.jakarta.go.id/id/peta

Indonesia: https://infeksiemerging.kemkes.go.id/

Worldwide:

The government already issue nationwide awareness for prevention and mitigation. WHO also already declared this case as a pandemic earlier today. Calling COVID-19 a pandemic does not mean that it has become more deadly, it is an acknowledgment of its global spread.

SUAKA asks the refugee community not to be panic. The virus transmission is preventable and can be managed through practicing personal hygiene, such as hand-washing, avoid face-touching, and follow good cough and sneeze etiquette. If you develop symptoms, and have been in close contact with a person known to have COVID-19, you should go to the doctor.

Don’t believe hoaxes on the internet, always double-check news or chain text messages shared on social media or messaging application (whatsapp/line/viber etc) THROUGH a reliable news source.

The best place to get reliable information is the WHO Website, www.who.int. Here you can find comprehensive advice, including more on how to minimize the risk of spreading or catching COVID-19. All sources of information available on SUAKA website, were checked and verified before published.

The site is currently being updated on a daily basis, so check in regularly.

It is also advisable to check the official Website of your local and regional municipality, which may have specific health information, as well as news concerning your community, such as travel guides, and outbreak hotspots.

Avoid big meetings and food-sharing. If you can work from home, do so. All nonessential large social gatherings should be reconsidered and, if possible, postponed. The easiest way how to identified ‘large social gathering’ if it is involving more than 10 people, it is LARGE.

SUAKA is preparing an illustrated information on the coronavirus in for Farsi speaker. The illustration was kindly provided and translated from Wei Man Kow original post on Coronavirus (check her other works on Comicsforgood.com or on Instagram @weimankow).

Other information is also available for other languages. SUAKA will try to compile this information.

 

source:

https://news.un.org/en/story/2020/03/1059261

https://www.cnbcindonesia.com/news/20200312084007-4-144256/sudah-34-orang-positif-corona-ri-tanggap-darurat

https://www.rte.ie/brainstorm/2020/0310/1121444-10-reasons-not-to-panic-about-the-coronavirus/

https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/global-opinions/you-should-not-panic-about-the-coronavirus-heres-what-you-should-do/2020/03/09/32f6b97c-622f-11ea-845d-e35b0234b136_story.html

https://time.com/5791661/who-coronavirus-pandemic-declaration/

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/about/symptoms.html

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/global-health/science-and-disease/coronavirus-symptoms-covid-19-cough-breathe-advice/

https://edition.cnn.com/2020/03/11/health/coronavirus-cold-allergies-flu-difference-symptoms-wellness-trnd/index.html

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/mar/11/coronavirus-symptoms-should-i-see-doctor-covid-19

Pathways to Refugee Wellbeing, Research on Asylum Seeker and Refugee in Indonesia

Who is conducting this study?

  • The Refugee Trauma and Recovery Program, from the University of New South Wales in Sydney, is working with HOST International, SUAKA and Universitas Gadjah Mada to conduct this study.

Why is the study important?

  • We want to learn about the experiences of refugees, and what kinds of things affect their wellbeing.
  • This will help us understand how refugees cope in their everyday life.
  • This knowledge will help to provide better support for refugees in a similar situation around the world.

Who can take part in this study?

  • Refugee and asylum-seeker adults (18 years +), who are eligible to participate.
  • As the surveys are on-line, you can take part in this study no matter where you live, as long as you have access to the internet. The surveys are in English, Arabic, Farsi, Dari, and Somali.
  • To take part in this study, you will need an email address. If you do not have an email address, you can get one here: (Gmail registration) One person can only use one email address.

What does the study involve?

  • First, we will ask you to register your interest in participating in this study, on our website.
  • Second, we will check if you are eligible to participate.
  • If you are eligible, and you agree to participate in the study, we will invite you to complete an online survey 4 times over 18 months.
  • The questions are about yourself, your experiences, your thoughts and feelings, and about the relationships you have with other people.
  • Each survey takes about one hour to complete.
  • To thank you for sharing your experiences, we will reimburse eligible participants for your time with an Indomaret voucher worth IDR 100,000 after you complete each survey.

What will happen to the information you collect from me?

  • All information provided by participants is highly confidential and is only accessed by the
    research team.
  • Only the UNSW research team and the HOST International Research Coordinator will have access to your personal information (e.g. contact details), so we can contact you for future time points.
  • Your information will not be shared with any service providers, UNHCR, or any
    governments.
  • These details will be stored separately from your survey responses.
  • Participating in this study will not affect the UNHCR process and the resettlement process.
  • You can choose to receive regular updates about the study in your own language.

Follow this link to register: www.rtrp-research.com/pathways-to-refugee-wellbeing-indonesia