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Posts tagged ‘asylum seekers’

Refugee Community-Based Paralegal Training 2020

Asylum seeker and refugee (ASR) are known to be one of the most marginalized groups in every part of the world. They have fled from their home countries due to persecution, seeking safer life. However, in practice, many ASR are not welcomed in various countries due to the rise of global extreme nationalism and irrational security regulation. This condition is further worsened in transit countries, meaning the countries who are not signatory to Refugee Convention and its Protocol, such as Indonesia.

As a host for 13.612 ASR (1), Indonesia has put a considerable amount of attention to ASR. In 2016, President Joko Widodo enforced Presidential Regulation 125/2016 on The Handling of Foreign Refugees. This marked the first legal recognition for ASR in Indonesia. However, said regulation does not cover the protection of rights for ASR in Indonesia, thus creating legal gaps on fulfilment of rights of ASR while in Indonesia.

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Diskusi Publik – Kondisi Kelompok Rentan di Tengah COVID-19

SUAKA akan mengadakan Diskusi Publik dengan tema “Kondisi Kelompok Rentan di Tengah COVID-19

Kelompok rentan yang akan dibahas dalam diskusi ini adalah, Pengungsi, Penyandang Disabilitas dan Buruh Migran.

Diskusi ini akan di moderatori oleh Julio Achmadi, Koordinator Legal Empowerment SUAKA, dan mengundang para narasumber:

  1. Yuzniar Adiputera, dosen dan peneliti di Institute of International Studies – Universitas Gajah Mada. Materi Presentasi Diskusi SUAKA: Kelompok Rentan COVID19 – Pengungsi
  2. Eny Rofiatul, divisi Counter Trafficking & Labor Migration, International Organization of Migration. Materi Presentasi Diskusi SUAKA: Kelompok Rentan COVID19 – PMI
  3. Saleh Al Ghifari, Pengacara Publik di Lembaga Bantuan Hukum Jakarta. Materi Presentasi Diskusi SUAKA: Kelompok Rentan COVID19 – Penyandang Disabilitas

Silahkan merapat ke link di bawah pada hari Rabu, 15 April 2020, mulai dari jam 15.00 sampai 16.30, untuk mengikuti diskusi dan bertanya jawab dengan para narasumber. Diskusi dibuka untuk umum, dan akan menggunakan bahasa pengantar – Bahasa Indonesia.

Diskusi dapat diikuti melalui Zoom Meeting dengan tautan https://zoom.us/j/120992931 atau dapat disimak live melalui Official Channel Youtube Lembaga Bantuan Hukum Jakarta

‘Impossible to self-isolate,’ Refugees in Indonesia Fear Coronavirus Outbreak

COMMENT: ‘Impossible to self-isolate,’ Refugees in Indonesia fear coronavirus outbreak.

Written by JN Joniad.

He is a Rohingya refugee living in Indonesia after attempting to flee Myanmar for Australia in 2013. He is now witnessing Indonesia’s large refugee and asylum seeker population battle with the coronavirus pandemic.

“For thousands of refugees and asylum seekers in Indonesia, it is impossible to keep any social distance.

There are over 14,000 refugees and asylum seekers living in limbo in Indonesia, with thousands having fled their country to seek refuge in Australia, only to be stranded there in transit. They are now at a greater risk of contracting COVID-19.  

In Jakarta, many refugees and asylum seekers share rooms and cramped apartments. Those in International Organisation for Migration (IOM) accommodation and camps live in overcrowded conditions. 

It is almost impossible for them to practice social distancing. With no basic rights to work, travel and use public health services, refugees and asylum seekers are further marginalised and the most vulnerable to the spread of coronavirus. “

Read the full article in https://www.sbs.com.au/news/dateline/comment-impossible-to-self-isolate-refugees-in-indonesia-fear-coronavirus-outbreak

Disclaimer: The views, information, or opinions expressed in the article above are solely those of the individuals involved and do not necessarily represent official views nor stance those of Perkumpulan SUAKA members. SUAKA is not responsible and does not verify for accuracy any of the information contained in the article above. The primary purpose of sharing the article above is to inform and provide alternative perspectives, with the end goal to provide comprehensive and holistic solutions for refugee rights protection.

Protection for refugees in Indonesia: A state responsibility

Refugees in Indonesia have staged many rallies this year. The street hosting the United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR) Indonesia, Jl. Kebon Sirih in Central Jakarta, was filled with refugees, requesting protection and a solution to their situation living in limbo for years, particularly from June to August.

Refugee migration is increasing worldwide as a result of civil wars and internal conflicts in various parts of the world. The UN estimates that as of last June, Indonesia had been a host to almost 14,000 refugees and asylum seekers from Afghanistan, Somalia, Iraq, Myanmar, Sudan, etc.

Indonesia has a responsibility as a state in providing protection for refugees and asylum seekers. Indonesia is not a signatory to the 1951 Refugee Convention and its 1967 Protocol. However, is being signatory to the aforementioned conventions the only pre-requisite for a state in providing protection for refugees in Indonesia?

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Education for Child Refugee in Indonesia

Do you ever imagine, what would happen if you don’t have any legal identity?

Losing an ID card might be a problem for us; we cannot open a bank account, apply for health insurance, or even check in to airports. These little things might be just a little disturbance in our daily life, and can be solved by a visit to police station. But, if no one will ever give it back to us, those little financial, health, and transportation issues will be a huge lifetime problem. And these are problems that every refugee struggled in. Read more