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Posts tagged ‘asylum seeker’

Diskusi Publik – Kondisi Kelompok Rentan di Tengah COVID-19

SUAKA akan mengadakan Diskusi Publik dengan tema “Kondisi Kelompok Rentan di Tengah COVID-19

Kelompok rentan yang akan dibahas dalam diskusi ini adalah, Pengungsi, Penyandang Disabilitas dan Buruh Migran.

Diskusi ini akan di moderatori oleh Julio Achmadi, Koordinator Legal Empowerment SUAKA, dan mengundang para narasumber:

  1. Yuzniar Adiputera, dosen dan peneliti di Institute of International Studies – Universitas Gajah Mada. Materi Presentasi Diskusi SUAKA: Kelompok Rentan COVID19 – Pengungsi
  2. Eny Rofiatul, divisi Counter Trafficking & Labor Migration, International Organization of Migration. Materi Presentasi Diskusi SUAKA: Kelompok Rentan COVID19 – PMI
  3. Saleh Al Ghifari, Pengacara Publik di Lembaga Bantuan Hukum Jakarta. Materi Presentasi Diskusi SUAKA: Kelompok Rentan COVID19 – Penyandang Disabilitas

Silahkan merapat ke link di bawah pada hari Rabu, 15 April 2020, mulai dari jam 15.00 sampai 16.30, untuk mengikuti diskusi dan bertanya jawab dengan para narasumber. Diskusi dibuka untuk umum, dan akan menggunakan bahasa pengantar – Bahasa Indonesia.

Diskusi dapat diikuti melalui Zoom Meeting dengan tautan https://zoom.us/j/120992931 atau dapat disimak live melalui Official Channel Youtube Lembaga Bantuan Hukum Jakarta

Postpone Visits to Doctors during COVID-19 Pandemic

Available in Farsi به زبان فارسی موجود است, click here to download

Do doctors’ appointments count as essential? Some appointments ― like a medical checkup or perhaps a dental cleaning ― you may be able to postpone, but what about vital screenings or monthly checkups for health conditions?

If it’s a nonessential visit to a doctor or dentist, reschedule it.

For elderly patients or those with significant medical conditions that limit their reserve, the most prudent advice at this time is to call the physician’s office and follow his/her advice

We need to “be responsible” to free up hospital beds and space.

Don’t go to the doctor’s office or the emergency room without calling ahead.
The coronavirus is highly contagious, and doctors want to protect themselves and their other patients from infection.
People who don’t have a doctor should call their local healthcare facilities to discuss symptoms.

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Storybook for Children on COVID-19

This book was a project developed by the Inter-Agency Standing Committee Reference Group on Mental Health and Psychosocial Support in Emergency Settings (IASC MHPSS RG). The project was supported by global, regional and country based experts from Member Agencies of the IASC MHPSS RG, in addition to parents, caregivers, teachers and children in 104 countries. A global survey was distributed in Arabic, English, Italian, French and Spanish to assess children’s mental health and psychosocial needs during the COVID-19 outbreak.

The e-book can be downloaded, by clicking here: My Hero is You, how kids can fight COVID-19

A framework of topics to be addressed through the story was developed using the survey results. The book was shared through storytelling to children in several countries affected by COVID-19. Feedback from children, parents and caregivers was then used to review and update the story.

Over 1,700 children, parents, caregivers and teachers from around the world took the time to share with us how they were coping with the COVID-19 pandemic. A big thank you to these children, their parents, caregivers and teachers for completing our surveys and influencing this story. This is a story developed for and by children around the world.

This IASC MHPSS RG acknowledge Helen Patuck for writing the story script and illustrating this book.

©IASC, 2020. This publication was published under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 IGO license (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 IGO; https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/igo). Under the terms of this license, you may reproduce, translate and adapt this Work for non-commercial purposes, provided the Work is appropriately cited.

Coronavirus and Refugee

Coronavirus and Refugee

Written by Julio Achmadi. Member of SUAKA, Coordinator of Legal Empowerment.

“At least 34 of the 114 countries affected by coronavirus outbreak are hosts to refugee populations, including Indonesia. Based on UNHCR Indonesia’s statistics in November 2019, Indonesia is a host of 13,693 asylum seekers and refugees (ASR), 28% of which are children and 2% elderly. ASR community in Indonesia is one of the most vulnerable, if not the most, to coronavirus.

Their vulnerability level is much higher due to their handicaps living in Indonesia. There are very limited resources allocated by the government for ASR community in general, there’s no protection of basic rights by the law, and no dissemination from the government on the virus outbreak to the ASR community.

ASR in Indonesia also face a problem in understanding actual situation on coronavirus because of the language barrier, thus violating their right to access to information. With no right to work, ASR communities in Indonesia might not be able to afford nutritional foods and sanitary products to protect them from the infectious disease. As of now, ASR community and Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) have been doing the work in translating information on coronavirus from various sources of languages to the ones understandable by refugees.”

Read the full article to see what types of solution that can be offered, short and long term, by following this link: https://en.tempo.co/read/1326578/coronavirus-and-refugee

COVID-19 Information for Refugees in Indonesia

(This article will be updated continuously to reflect current situation)

The situation with Coronavirus, known also as SARS-CoV-2 or COVID-19, in Indonesia is escalating very quickly.

The government already issue nationwide awareness for prevention and mitigation. WHO also already declared this case as a pandemic earlier today. Calling COVID-19 a pandemic does not mean that it has become more deadly, it is an acknowledgment of its global spread.

SUAKA asks the refugee community not to be panic. The virus transmission is preventable and can be managed through practicing personal hygiene, such as hand-washing, avoid face-touching, and follow good cough and sneeze etiquette. If you develop symptoms, and have been in close contact with a person known to have COVID-19, you should go to the doctor.

Don’t believe hoaxes on the internet, always double-check news or chain text messages shared on social media or messaging application (whatsapp/line/viber etc) THROUGH a reliable news source.

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