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Posts from the ‘Information for Public’ Category

مواد به فارسی (Resources in Persian Dari Language)

Please find links below for video information available in the Persian Dari language.

These resources are prepared in collaboration with JRS Indonesia and SMART for Global.

Postpone your visit to the doctor during this pandemic.

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Training Paralegal Komunitas Pengungsi

(English version below)

Training Paralegal Komunitas untuk Pengungsi ini diselenggarakan pada tanggal 27-29 Juli 2019. Training ini diikuti oleh 22 peserta dengan latar belakang kewarganegaraan yang beragam yang merupakan pengungsi yang telah mengikuti proses seleksi dan berasal dari Jakarta dan Bogor.

Indonesia tidak dapat mengesampingkan komitmen konstitusionalnya serta kewajiban internasionalnya untuk menegakkan hak asasi manusia untuk semua orang, meski belum menjadi pihak dalam Konvensi Pengungsi 1951.

Peraturan Presiden No.125 tahun 2016, sangat disadari, tidak cukup untuk melindungi hak-hak pengungsi yang tinggal di Indonesia. Akan tetapi, perlu diingat, Indonesia telah mengadopsi ke dalam kerangka hukum nasionalnya, pelbagai prinsip hak asasi manusia yang sudah diakui secara universal. Pelanggaran atas hak -hak tersebut sama dengan mendiskriminasi dan melanggar hak asasi manusia para pengungsi.

Pada kenyataannya, SUAKA menemukan bahwa para pengungsi rentan terhadap pelanggaran hak asasi mereka. Sementara itu, mereka tidak memiliki akses terhadap bantuan hukum yang dapat diandalkan. SUAKA melihat pemberdayaan hukum sebagai strategi terbaik untuk mengatasi tantangan ini.

Pemberdayaan dilakukan untuk membangun kapasitas pengungsi dalam memahami hak mereka, mengetahui kerangka hukum Indonesia yang ada, dan memiliki keterampilan advokasi hukum, dengan harapan bahwa pengungsi akan mampu mengadvokasi diri mereka sendiri atau membantu pengungsi lain menghadapi potensi pelanggaran hak-hak pengungsi.

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Protection for refugees in Indonesia: A state responsibility

Refugees in Indonesia have staged many rallies this year. The street hosting the United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR) Indonesia, Jl. Kebon Sirih in Central Jakarta, was filled with refugees, requesting protection and a solution to their situation living in limbo for years, particularly from June to August.

Refugee migration is increasing worldwide as a result of civil wars and internal conflicts in various parts of the world. The UN estimates that as of last June, Indonesia had been a host to almost 14,000 refugees and asylum seekers from Afghanistan, Somalia, Iraq, Myanmar, Sudan, etc.

Indonesia has a responsibility as a state in providing protection for refugees and asylum seekers. Indonesia is not a signatory to the 1951 Refugee Convention and its 1967 Protocol. However, is being signatory to the aforementioned conventions the only pre-requisite for a state in providing protection for refugees in Indonesia?

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Resettlement Information for Asylum Seeker and Refugee

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This information will help you to answer frequently asked questions specifically on resettlement, and durable solutions in general.This page is for information purposes only. It is not legal advice.

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FACTS:

SUAKA is unable to assist with or give advice regarding resettlement to a Third Country. The decision to accept a refugee for resettlement is made by the resettlement country.

Less than 5% of the worldwide refugee population will be offered resettlement. This means less than 1 in every 200 people.

Resettlement is not a right. Resettlement is not an obligation of other countries. Countries that have signed the International Refugee Convention do not have to offer resettlement.

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Durable solutions

There are three official durable solutions for someone who has been recognized as a refugee by UNHCR.

  1. Resettlement to a Third Country that accepts refugees from UNHCR;
  2. Integration with local population of the Country they were found to be a refugee in;
  3. Repatriation to Country of Origin – if the risk of persecution is no longer present.

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Resettlement to a Third Country

Resettlement can be formally made only to a Country which is a party to the United Nations Refugee Convention. Indonesia has not signed the Refugee Convention.

Once an asylum seeker is recognized as a refugee, and if they meet resettlement criteria, a refugee may be asked to attend UNHCR for a resettlement interview. After this, their basic information may be sent to the embassy of resettlement Countries. The resettlement Country does not receive your complete file, only basic information along with an application from UNHCR, called a ‘Resettlement Registration Form (RRF).

Under UNHCR guidelines, and the policies of resettlement countries, resettlement priority is given to persons who are most vulnerable – those with serious medical conditions, unaccompanied children, women at risk, etc. Waiting is very difficult, but there are only a very small number of resettlement places and a very very large number of people waiting to be resettled.

The decision to resettle a refugee is made by the resettlement Country only. Not by UNHCR. The resettlement Country will consider applications made by UNHCR, in line with their Countries resettlement and humanitarian policies.

The time provided by each Country to consider a resettlement request depends on many factors, including each Countries resettlement and humanitarian policies, and the number of refugees the Country offers to resettle every year. Quotas for each Country may change from year to year, depending on the policies of that country.

Neither SUAKA nor UNHCR is not able to give a timeline for resettlement. We cannot give a timeline for how long it will take a resettlement Country to reply once a resettlement application has been made.

SUAKA cannot assist with resettlement applications. If you believe you may meet vulnerability guidelines please email us a copy of your refugee card and explain why you think you are at increased risk and require resettlement. Email:  suaka.legalaid@gmail.com

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Intergration with local population.

Currently, Indonesia is not signatory to the International Refugee Convention and cannot officially accept refugees for permanent resettlement.

Many refugees may be in Indonesia for a long time, many years, and informally integrate into Indonesia by getting to know their Indonesian neighbours and taking part in day to day life in their community.

At this point in time, refugees in Indonesia do not have the right to work. Refugee children do have a right to education however in practice, language, cultural barriers and costs often make attending school very difficult.

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Repatriation/voluntary repatriation.

If UNHCR decides a country is safe for return, refugees from that country living in Indonesia may be repatriated back to their home country. This process is complex and does not occur very often.

A refugee may also make the decision to return to their home country voluntarily. UNHCR will consider all of the available information and make a decision whether it is safe for the refugee to return. If it is, UNHCR partners such as IOM (International Organisation for Migration) will assist to organize your return. If UNHCR does not think it is safe they will be unable to assist the refugee to return. The refugee may still decide to return on their own without the assistance of UNHCR.

The UNHCR resettlement handbook is available HERE http://www.unhcr.org/protection/resettlement/4a2ccf4c6/unhcr-resettlement-handbook-country-chapters.html

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What else can you do?

 Suaka continues to campaign in Indonesia for work rights for refugees. Many organizations around the world campaign in their own country for their governments to increase resettlement places.  You can support our campaign, and also ask any friends in Indonesia and other countries to support Suaka so we can continue to advocate for refugees.

  1. Learn Indonesian language (Bahasa Indonesia). It will help you communicate with people in your local area. If your children can become fluent in Indonesian it will help them to get a chance to be place in a local school.
  1. If you are a university graduate, research student scholarships in other countries. There are more universities offering scholarships for refugees now. For example, Kiron University in Germany accepts asylum seekers and refugees as online students. Check >> https://www.goethe.de/en/kul/wis/20668117.html
  1. If you have family members in countries where refugees are resettled, ask them to go to a refugee legal clinic or other place that gives legal advice and ask if they can sponsor you to come to their country.
Picture credit: http://www.resettlement.eu/page/volunteering-refugee-resettlement-0

Supporting System of Refugee and Asylum Seekers in Indonesia

Lack of Support Services

The limited capacity of UNHCR in Indonesia to deal with increasing numbers of asylum seekers and low resettlement places leads to significant waiting periods. The lack of information and assistance available to asylum seekers and refugees to support themselves and their families leads to frustration and desperation for many people of concern. Read more