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Posts from the ‘Refugee Status Determination’ Category

Resettlement Information for Asylum Seeker and Refugee

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This information will help you to answer frequently asked questions specifically on resettlement, and durable solutions in general.This page is for information purposes only. It is not legal advice.

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FACTS:

SUAKA is unable to assist with or give advice regarding resettlement to a Third Country. The decision to accept a refugee for resettlement is made by the resettlement country.

Less than 5% of the worldwide refugee population will be offered resettlement. This means less than 1 in every 200 people.

Resettlement is not a right. Resettlement is not an obligation of other countries. Countries that have signed the International Refugee Convention do not have to offer resettlement.

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Durable solutions

There are three official durable solutions for someone who has been recognized as a refugee by UNHCR.

  1. Resettlement to a Third Country that accepts refugees from UNHCR;
  2. Integration with local population of the Country they were found to be a refugee in;
  3. Repatriation to Country of Origin – if the risk of persecution is no longer present.

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Resettlement to a Third Country

Resettlement can be formally made only to a Country which is a party to the United Nations Refugee Convention. Indonesia has not signed the Refugee Convention.

Once an asylum seeker is recognized as a refugee, and if they meet resettlement criteria, a refugee may be asked to attend UNHCR for a resettlement interview. After this, their basic information may be sent to the embassy of resettlement Countries. The resettlement Country does not receive your complete file, only basic information along with an application from UNHCR, called a ‘Resettlement Registration Form (RRF).

Under UNHCR guidelines, and the policies of resettlement countries, resettlement priority is given to persons who are most vulnerable – those with serious medical conditions, unaccompanied children, women at risk, etc. Waiting is very difficult, but there are only a very small number of resettlement places and a very very large number of people waiting to be resettled.

The decision to resettle a refugee is made by the resettlement Country only. Not by UNHCR. The resettlement Country will consider applications made by UNHCR, in line with their Countries resettlement and humanitarian policies.

The time provided by each Country to consider a resettlement request depends on many factors, including each Countries resettlement and humanitarian policies, and the number of refugees the Country offers to resettle every year. Quotas for each Country may change from year to year, depending on the policies of that country.

Neither SUAKA nor UNHCR is not able to give a timeline for resettlement. We cannot give a timeline for how long it will take a resettlement Country to reply once a resettlement application has been made.

SUAKA cannot assist with resettlement applications. If you believe you may meet vulnerability guidelines please email us a copy of your refugee card and explain why you think you are at increased risk and require resettlement. Email:  suaka.legalaid@gmail.com

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Intergration with local population.

Currently, Indonesia is not signatory to the International Refugee Convention and cannot officially accept refugees for permanent resettlement.

Many refugees may be in Indonesia for a long time, many years, and informally integrate into Indonesia by getting to know their Indonesian neighbours and taking part in day to day life in their community.

At this point in time, refugees in Indonesia do not have the right to work. Refugee children do have a right to education however in practice, language, cultural barriers and costs often make attending school very difficult.

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Repatriation/voluntary repatriation.

If UNHCR decides a country is safe for return, refugees from that country living in Indonesia may be repatriated back to their home country. This process is complex and does not occur very often.

A refugee may also make the decision to return to their home country voluntarily. UNHCR will consider all of the available information and make a decision whether it is safe for the refugee to return. If it is, UNHCR partners such as IOM (International Organisation for Migration) will assist to organize your return. If UNHCR does not think it is safe they will be unable to assist the refugee to return. The refugee may still decide to return on their own without the assistance of UNHCR.

The UNHCR resettlement handbook is available HERE http://www.unhcr.org/protection/resettlement/4a2ccf4c6/unhcr-resettlement-handbook-country-chapters.html

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What else can you do?

 Suaka continues to campaign in Indonesia for work rights for refugees. Many organizations around the world campaign in their own country for their governments to increase resettlement places.  You can support our campaign, and also ask any friends in Indonesia and other countries to support Suaka so we can continue to advocate for refugees.

  1. Learn Indonesian language (Bahasa Indonesia). It will help you communicate with people in your local area. If your children can become fluent in Indonesian it will help them to get a chance to be place in a local school.
  1. If you are a university graduate, research student scholarships in other countries. There are more universities offering scholarships for refugees now. For example, Kiron University in Germany accepts asylum seekers and refugees as online students. Check >> https://www.goethe.de/en/kul/wis/20668117.html
  1. If you have family members in countries where refugees are resettled, ask them to go to a refugee legal clinic or other place that gives legal advice and ask if they can sponsor you to come to their country.
Picture credit: http://www.resettlement.eu/page/volunteering-refugee-resettlement-0
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How to Prepare Your RSD Interview (2)

The purpose of the interview is for the UNHCR to decide if you are a refugee under the 1951 Convention or the extended mandate definition. Here’s some suggestion that you may take in order to prepare your interview with UNHCR; Read more

How to Prepare Your RSD Interview (1)

The purpose of the interview is for the UNHCR to decide if you are a refugee under the 1951 Convention or the extended mandate definition. Here’s some suggestion that you may take in order to prepare your interview with UNHCR; Read more

Self Help Kit: Appeal on UNHCR Refugee Status Determination

 

Due to the large number of people requesting legal aid, Suaka is unable to meet with you until you have done your best to provide these things. If you cannot read and write please speak with other members of your community and ask them to help you write your statement.

This page is for information only. It is not legal advice.

Please find information about Suaka’s services below:

SUAKA’s legal advisors are trained volunteers, they receive no payment.
SUAKA’s legal services are free. If anyone in your community asks for money to help you speak to us this is wrong.
SUAKA’s legal services are confidential – we do not share your information with any other organisation.
SUAKA is independent from UNHCR, IOM, Immigration, Police and Government.
SUAKA’s legal advisors are not able to influence UNHCR’s decisions. We cannot guarantee your application will succeed. We cannot make your application proceed more quickly.
SUAKA provides legal assistance only in relation to UNHCR applications for asylum (Refugee Status Determination – RSD).
SUAKA can provide limited information about the resettlement process but cannot assist with resettlement or sponsorship
SUAKA cannot provide material, financial or other assistance.
SUAKA’s Legal Aid Services are provided in accordance with the Nairobi Code.
SUAKA’s Volunteer Legal Advisors follow SUAKA Legal Aid Services Code of Conduct.

Information on UNHCR Appeal process, please read carefully.

If your application to UNHCR has been rejected, please read SUAKA’s Self Help Kit (SHK) for Appeals. 

SHKs are only available in English for now. They will soon be available in Farsi, Dari, Arabic, Tamil, Urdu, Oromo, Bahasa Indonesia.

Please download and read our Appeal Self Help Kit (SHK):
Suaka RSD Self Help Kit – APPEAL (Mar 2015).pdf

It includes information to help you understand:

  • What is a refugee?
  • Why you were your claim rejected by UNHCR?
  • Whether you should appeal.
  • How to write your appeal statement if you decide to appeal. You must write you appeal statement according to outline in SHK.
  • Problems at interviews.
  • Separately answer each rejection reason from your UNHCR letter of notification of rejection.
  • Write your story again from beginning to end, including as much detail as possible.

Once you have read the SHK, begin to write your statement.

If you would like advice on your completed statement please email suaka.legalaid@gmail.com and we will contact you.
Your email must include:

1. Copy of an asylum seeker certificate for every member of your family
2. Your written statement/history
3. Your contact phone number

You may also message Suaka legal aid on Whatsapp, Viber or Line on 0812 8425 6583

2013 Refugee Info Sessions 2

Self Help Kit: First Instance on UNHCR Refugee Status Determination

Due to the large number of people requesting legal aid, Suaka is unable to meet with you until you have done your best to provide these things. If you cannot read and write please speak with other members of your community and ask them to help you write your statement.

This page is for information only. It is not legal advice.

First Instance information, please read carefully.

This page explains the process of applying for refugee status in Indonesia.

Please download and read our First Instance Self Help Kit (SHK).
Suaka RSD Self Help Kit – FIRST INSTANCE.pdf

SHKs are only available in English for now. They will soon be available in Farsi, Dari, Arabic, Tamil, Urdu, Oromo, Bahasa Indonesia.

SUAKA SHKs include information about every step of the ‘Refugee Status Determination’ process, to help you understand what is required and what your rights are, including:
– what it means to be a refugee
– the process of becoming a refugee
– what information to provide to UNHCR
– how to write your statement.

Once you have read the SHK, begin to write your statement.

If you would like advice on your completed statement please email suaka.legalaid@gmail.com and we will contact you.
Your email must include:

1. Copy of an asylum seeker certificate for every member of your family
2. Your written statement/history
3. Your contact phone number

Please find information about Suaka’s services below:

SUAKA’s legal advisors are trained volunteers, they receive no payment.
SUAKA’s legal services are free. If anyone in your community asks for money to help you speak to us this is wrong.
SUAKA’s legal services are confidential – we do not share your information with any other organisation.
SUAKA is independent from UNHCR, IOM, Immigration, Police and Government.
SUAKA’s legal advisors are not able to influence UNHCR’s decisions. We cannot guarantee your application will succeed. We cannot make your application proceed more quickly.
SUAKA provides legal assistance only in relation to UNHCR applications for asylum (Refugee Status Determination – RSD).
SUAKA can provide limited information about the resettlement process but cannot assist with resettlement or sponsorship
SUAKA cannot provide material, financial or other assistance.
SUAKA’s Legal Aid Services are provided in accordance with the Nairobi Code
SUAKA’s Volunteer Legal Advisors follow SUAKA Legal Aid Services Code of Conduct

You may also message Suaka legal aid on Whatsapp, Viber or Line on 0812 8425 6583

2013 Refugee Info Sessions 2