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Posts from the ‘Information for Asylum Seekers’ Category

Mode of Transportation Restriction during PSBB Policy

Available in Farsi به زبان فارسی موجود است, click here to download

Ditlantas Polda Metro Jaya (Jakarta Traffic Police Division) is starting to record vehicle users who violated the large-scale social restrictions (PSBB) to overcome the coronavirus in DKI Jakarta.

The data collection was done through a Warning Notification given to motorists who violated. Later, if the driver is found to have committed a similar violation again, he will be immediately sanctioned.

The Ditlantas has also added surveillance posts regarding the implementation of PSBB in Bodetabek. There are a total of 158 checkpoints in Jabodetabek (Jakarta Bogor Depok Tangerang Bekasi).

The warning notification given to the driver was the modification of the traffic ticket. The difference is that the police will not confiscate a SIM or STNK that receives a reprimand letter. Traffic tickets are known to be usually given by police officers to motorists who are judged to have violated the rules or traffic signs. Read more

Postpone Visits to Doctors during COVID-19 Pandemic

Available in Farsi به زبان فارسی موجود است, click here to download

Do doctors’ appointments count as essential? Some appointments ― like a medical checkup or perhaps a dental cleaning ― you may be able to postpone, but what about vital screenings or monthly checkups for health conditions?

If it’s a nonessential visit to a doctor or dentist, reschedule it.

For elderly patients or those with significant medical conditions that limit their reserve, the most prudent advice at this time is to call the physician’s office and follow his/her advice

We need to “be responsible” to free up hospital beds and space.

Don’t go to the doctor’s office or the emergency room without calling ahead.
The coronavirus is highly contagious, and doctors want to protect themselves and their other patients from infection.
People who don’t have a doctor should call their local healthcare facilities to discuss symptoms.

Read more

Storybook for Children on COVID-19

This book was a project developed by the Inter-Agency Standing Committee Reference Group on Mental Health and Psychosocial Support in Emergency Settings (IASC MHPSS RG). The project was supported by global, regional and country based experts from Member Agencies of the IASC MHPSS RG, in addition to parents, caregivers, teachers and children in 104 countries. A global survey was distributed in Arabic, English, Italian, French and Spanish to assess children’s mental health and psychosocial needs during the COVID-19 outbreak.

The e-book can be downloaded, by clicking here: My Hero is You, how kids can fight COVID-19

A framework of topics to be addressed through the story was developed using the survey results. The book was shared through storytelling to children in several countries affected by COVID-19. Feedback from children, parents and caregivers was then used to review and update the story.

Over 1,700 children, parents, caregivers and teachers from around the world took the time to share with us how they were coping with the COVID-19 pandemic. A big thank you to these children, their parents, caregivers and teachers for completing our surveys and influencing this story. This is a story developed for and by children around the world.

This IASC MHPSS RG acknowledge Helen Patuck for writing the story script and illustrating this book.

©IASC, 2020. This publication was published under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 IGO license (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 IGO; https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/igo). Under the terms of this license, you may reproduce, translate and adapt this Work for non-commercial purposes, provided the Work is appropriately cited.

Pathways to Refugee Wellbeing, Research on Asylum Seeker and Refugee in Indonesia

Who is conducting this study?

  • The Refugee Trauma and Recovery Program, from the University of New South Wales in Sydney, is working with HOST International, SUAKA and Universitas Gadjah Mada to conduct this study.

Why is the study important?

  • We want to learn about the experiences of refugees, and what kinds of things affect their wellbeing.
  • This will help us understand how refugees cope in their everyday life.
  • This knowledge will help to provide better support for refugees in a similar situation around the world.

Who can take part in this study?

  • Refugee and asylum-seeker adults (18 years +), who are eligible to participate.
  • As the surveys are on-line, you can take part in this study no matter where you live, as long as you have access to the internet. The surveys are in English, Arabic, Farsi, Dari, and Somali.
  • To take part in this study, you will need an email address. If you do not have an email address, you can get one here: (Gmail registration) One person can only use one email address.

What does the study involve?

  • First, we will ask you to register your interest in participating in this study, on our website.
  • Second, we will check if you are eligible to participate.
  • If you are eligible, and you agree to participate in the study, we will invite you to complete an online survey 4 times over 18 months.
  • The questions are about yourself, your experiences, your thoughts and feelings, and about the relationships you have with other people.
  • Each survey takes about one hour to complete.
  • To thank you for sharing your experiences, we will reimburse eligible participants for your time with an Indomaret voucher worth IDR 100,000 after you complete each survey.

What will happen to the information you collect from me?

  • All information provided by participants is highly confidential and is only accessed by the
    research team.
  • Only the UNSW research team and the HOST International Research Coordinator will have access to your personal information (e.g. contact details), so we can contact you for future time points.
  • Your information will not be shared with any service providers, UNHCR, or any
    governments.
  • These details will be stored separately from your survey responses.
  • Participating in this study will not affect the UNHCR process and the resettlement process.
  • You can choose to receive regular updates about the study in your own language.

Follow this link to register: www.rtrp-research.com/pathways-to-refugee-wellbeing-indonesia

 

Resettlement Information for Asylum Seeker and Refugee

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This information will help you to answer frequently asked questions specifically on resettlement, and durable solutions in general.This page is for information purposes only. It is not legal advice.

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FACTS:

SUAKA is unable to assist with or give advice regarding resettlement to a Third Country. The decision to accept a refugee for resettlement is made by the resettlement country.

Less than 5% of the worldwide refugee population will be offered resettlement. This means less than 1 in every 200 people.

Resettlement is not a right. Resettlement is not an obligation of other countries. Countries that have signed the International Refugee Convention do not have to offer resettlement.

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Durable solutions

There are three official durable solutions for someone who has been recognized as a refugee by UNHCR.

  1. Resettlement to a Third Country that accepts refugees from UNHCR;
  2. Integration with local population of the Country they were found to be a refugee in;
  3. Repatriation to Country of Origin – if the risk of persecution is no longer present.

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Resettlement to a Third Country

Resettlement can be formally made only to a Country which is a party to the United Nations Refugee Convention. Indonesia has not signed the Refugee Convention.

Once an asylum seeker is recognized as a refugee, and if they meet resettlement criteria, a refugee may be asked to attend UNHCR for a resettlement interview. After this, their basic information may be sent to the embassy of resettlement Countries. The resettlement Country does not receive your complete file, only basic information along with an application from UNHCR, called a ‘Resettlement Registration Form (RRF).

Under UNHCR guidelines, and the policies of resettlement countries, resettlement priority is given to persons who are most vulnerable – those with serious medical conditions, unaccompanied children, women at risk, etc. Waiting is very difficult, but there are only a very small number of resettlement places and a very very large number of people waiting to be resettled.

The decision to resettle a refugee is made by the resettlement Country only. Not by UNHCR. The resettlement Country will consider applications made by UNHCR, in line with their Countries resettlement and humanitarian policies.

The time provided by each Country to consider a resettlement request depends on many factors, including each Countries resettlement and humanitarian policies, and the number of refugees the Country offers to resettle every year. Quotas for each Country may change from year to year, depending on the policies of that country.

Neither SUAKA nor UNHCR is not able to give a timeline for resettlement. We cannot give a timeline for how long it will take a resettlement Country to reply once a resettlement application has been made.

SUAKA cannot assist with resettlement applications. If you believe you may meet vulnerability guidelines please email us a copy of your refugee card and explain why you think you are at increased risk and require resettlement. Email:  suaka.legalaid@gmail.com

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Intergration with local population.

Currently, Indonesia is not signatory to the International Refugee Convention and cannot officially accept refugees for permanent resettlement.

Many refugees may be in Indonesia for a long time, many years, and informally integrate into Indonesia by getting to know their Indonesian neighbours and taking part in day to day life in their community.

At this point in time, refugees in Indonesia do not have the right to work. Refugee children do have a right to education however in practice, language, cultural barriers and costs often make attending school very difficult.

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Repatriation/voluntary repatriation.

If UNHCR decides a country is safe for return, refugees from that country living in Indonesia may be repatriated back to their home country. This process is complex and does not occur very often.

A refugee may also make the decision to return to their home country voluntarily. UNHCR will consider all of the available information and make a decision whether it is safe for the refugee to return. If it is, UNHCR partners such as IOM (International Organisation for Migration) will assist to organize your return. If UNHCR does not think it is safe they will be unable to assist the refugee to return. The refugee may still decide to return on their own without the assistance of UNHCR.

The UNHCR resettlement handbook is available HERE http://www.unhcr.org/protection/resettlement/4a2ccf4c6/unhcr-resettlement-handbook-country-chapters.html

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What else can you do?

 Suaka continues to campaign in Indonesia for work rights for refugees. Many organizations around the world campaign in their own country for their governments to increase resettlement places.  You can support our campaign, and also ask any friends in Indonesia and other countries to support Suaka so we can continue to advocate for refugees.

  1. Learn Indonesian language (Bahasa Indonesia). It will help you communicate with people in your local area. If your children can become fluent in Indonesian it will help them to get a chance to be place in a local school.
  1. If you are a university graduate, research student scholarships in other countries. There are more universities offering scholarships for refugees now. For example, Kiron University in Germany accepts asylum seekers and refugees as online students. Check >> https://www.goethe.de/en/kul/wis/20668117.html
  1. If you have family members in countries where refugees are resettled, ask them to go to a refugee legal clinic or other place that gives legal advice and ask if they can sponsor you to come to their country.
Picture credit: http://www.resettlement.eu/page/volunteering-refugee-resettlement-0